#BUYcottIsrael

17 May

If you understand that Boycotting, Divesting from or Sanctioning Israel (otherwise known as the BDS movement) in fact does nothing to enable a peace process between Israel and the Palestinians, then you may roll your eyes every time you see a call to “Boycott products made in Israel”.  Let’s take it one step further and participate in a BUYcott campaign!

Below are stores in the local area where you can find Israeli products. If you know of a store that is not listed, please let us know.  When you’re out buying Israeli made products, snap a photo of yourself, post it to our Facebook pagebuycott_Jessi_publixArrows

Bed Bath and Beyond

The Walking Company

Taste of Europe

Publix

CostCo

BJ’s Wholesale

Ace Hardware

Lowe’s

Home Depot

Sam’s Club

Target

Walmart

And below is an extensive list of companies that support Israel in some way or another, with the brands they own. This list alone is a WIN for beauty and fashion connoisseurs.

Estée Lauder: Chairman Ronald Lauder is the current president of the Jewish National Fund (JNF), which owns approximately 13% of land in the state of Israel.

Estée Lauder brands:

  • Aveda
  • Coach cosmetics
  • Smashbox
  • Tom Ford
  • Aramis
  • Bumble and Bumble
  • Aerin
  • American Beauty
  • Clinique
  • Bobbi Brown
  • Darphin
  • Donna Karan
  • Ermenegildo Zegna
  • Flirt!
  • Goodskin Labs
  • Grassroots Research Labs
  • Jo Malone
  • Kiton
  • La Mer
  • Lab series skincare for men
  • MAC
  • Michael Kors
  • OJON
  • Origins
  • OSIAO
  • Prescriptives
  • Tommy Hilfiger
  • Tory Burch

Ahava

Revlon: Revlon’s largest stakeholder, Ronald Perelman, is a major trustee of the Simon Weisenthal foundation, Revlon also owns Almay.

L’Oreal:  L’Oreal Israel also manufacturers a line of products using Dead Sea minerals under the name “Natural Sea Beauty” that is exported to 22 countries.

L’Oreal brands:

  • Lancome
  • Giorgio Armani Beauty
  • Yves Saint Laurent Beauté
  • Biotherm
  • Kiehl’s
  • Ralph Lauren
  • Shu Uemura
  • Cacharel
  • Helena Rubinstein
  • Clarisonic
  • Diesel
  • Viktor & Rolf
  • Yue Sai
  • Maison Martin Margiela
  • Urban Decay
  • Guy Laroche
  • Paloma Picasso
  • Vichy
  • La Roche-Posay
  • SkinCeuticals
  • Inneov
  • Rogers&Gallet
  • Sanoflore
  • L’Oreal Paris
  • Garnier
  • Maybelline New York
  • Carson
  • Essie
  • The Body Shop
  • L’Oreal Professionnel
  • Kérastase
  • Redken
  • Matrix
  • Pureology
  • Shu Uemura Art of Hair
  • Mizani
  • NYX (recent acquisition)

Procter & Gamble 

Procter & Gamble brands include:

  • Always
  • Tampax
  • Luvs
  • Pampers
  • Bounty
  • Naturella
  • Tempo
  • Charmin
  • Whisper
  • Dodot
  • Puffs
  • Crest
  • Gillette
  • Oral-B
  • Scope
  • Vicks
  • Venus
  • Clearblue
  • Fusion
  • Braun
  • CoverGirl
  • Herbal Essences
  • Max Factor
  • Nice ‘n Easy
  • Pantene
  • Vidal Sassoon
  • Dolce & Gabbana
  • Ivory
  • Aussie
  • Head & Shoulders
  • Old Spice
  • Secret
  • Olay
  • Clairol Professional
  • Cheer
  • Bounce
  • Daz
  • Era
  • Gain
  • Clean
  • Comet
  • Downy
  • Fab
  • Gala
  • Proper
  • Ariel
  • Cascade
  • Dash
  • Dawn
  • Dreft Laundry
  • Fairy
  • Joy
  • Myth
  • Swiffer
  • Febreeze
  • Duracell

Johnson & Johnson: In 1998 Israel bestowed a Jubilee Award to Johnson & Johnson. Awarded personally by Israeli Prime Minister Netanyahu on Israel’s 50th anniversary, the Jubilee Awards were given to select individuals and companies who, through their investments and trade relationships, have done the most to strengthen the Israeli economy.

Johnson & Johnson brands:

  • Johnson’s baby products
  • Aveeno
  • Lubriderm
  • Aveeno
  • Neutrogena
  • Vendome
  • Clean & Clear
  • Roc
  • Bebe
  • Band-Aid
  • Bengay
  • Neosporin
  • Cortaid
  • Listerine
  • Rembrandt
  • Tylenol
  • Sudafed
  • Pepcid
  • Nicorette
  • Motrin
  • Immodium
  • Dolormin
  • Benadryl
  • Mylanta
  • Zyrtec
  • Splenda
  • Benecol
  • Lactaid
  • Visine
  • Acuvue contact lenses

Kimberly-Clark:They also received a Jubilee Award in 1998.

Kimberly-Clark brands:

  • Kotex
  • Depends
  • Poise
  • Kleenex
  • Scott
  • Viva
  • Cottonelle
  • Wondersoft
  • Thick & Thirsty
  • Huggies
  • Pull-Ups
  • GoodNites, Little Swimmers, Snugglers, etc

 

 

Moroccanoil hair products: made in Israel

Lavan body products: made in Israel

Albaad Rostam tampons: Albaad Rostam products are made in Israel. The company manufactures private label tampons for major companies in the US.

Generic tampon brands by Albaad Rostam:

  • Target (Up&Up)
  • Wal Mart (Equate)
  • Kroger (Kroger, Ralphs, Dillons, Smith’s, King Soopers, Fry’s, QFC, City Market, Owen’s, Jay C, Pay Less, Baker’s, Gerbes, Scott’s Food & Pharmacy, Harris Teeter)
  • Walgreens
  • Rite Aid
  • CVS

Delta Galil industries: Israeli textile companies

Clothing brands using Delta Galil fabric:

  • Nike
  • Calvin Klein
  • Victoria’s Secret
  • Columbia
  • Lacoste
  • Walmart
  • Tommy Hilfiger
  • Triumph
  • United Colors of Benetton
  • Hugo Boss
  • Kenneth Cole
  • Target
  • Avia
  • Converse
  • Penguin
  • Lulu Lemon
  • MLB
  • JC Penney
  • Pierre Cardin
  • HEMA
  • Wilson
  • Marks and Spencer
  • BHS
  • UnderArmor
  • Maidenform
  • Sam’s Club
  • Spanx
  • Wacoal
  • Etam
  • 1,000 Mile
  • Wolf Lingerie
  • Dillard’s
  • Umbro
  • Saucony
  • SweatyBetty
  • Lane Bryant
  • Joop!
  • Marc O’Polo
  • Matalan
  • Sears
  • Primark
  • Hunkemoller

So get beautiful, diaper your child, wear your Friday best and BUYcott Israel! 

Israeli President Rivlin’s Message on Independence Day

11 May Reuven_Rivlin_as_the_president_of_Israel

May 10th, 2016

In honor of the upcoming national days, President Reuven Rivlin sent an Independence Day message to Jewish communities and friends of Israel around the world.

 

In his message – which can be viewed here – President Rivlin spoke of his memories as a nine year old child, seeing the flag of Israel raised for the first time as the flag of an independent, sovereign state, he said, “Today, each time I see the flag flying, it fills my heart with pride and joy. As Israel turns 68, we can look with pride, at our past, and must look to the future with hope. The State of Israel was born out of a hope of 2000 years. It was born with the bravery of dreamers who worked to turn their dream into reality. Their spirit stays with us today. In the past year, I have visited many different places across this wonderful country, I have seen this spirit, this joy and pride, which still pushes us forward.”

 

The President spoke of the terrible price of terrorism and said, “Sadly, over the last year Israel has faced a wave of terrible terror attacks which has brought much pain, and left many painful scars. I sat in the houses, of the families who lost loved ones, soldiers and civilians, I felt their pain, and shared in their tears.” He stressed, “Terror will not overcome us, even though it may take a terrible price.” 

 

The President highlighted the importance of celebrating diversity in Israel’s democracy, “Real independence, means the freedom of expression, to celebrate and enjoy the diversity of voices of all the people in Israel, as different as they may be; whether we agree with them or not. An inclusive nation, which knows to debate and discuss with respect and understanding.”

 

The President concluded, “Our Independence Day is a day to celebrate. It is a day to lift the flag high in the knowledge that our hope will lead us to find the way to overcome the challenges, and to spread a message of understanding and respect between one another. And while around our borders, and even inside our borders, blow the terrible winds of radical Islam, we are sure of our path and of our ability and right to build here our national home, with security and prosperity.”

Why Are Jews the Only Minority We Don’t Protect On College Campuses? (repost)

6 May Univeristy of chicago council vote on BDS

*The following is a repost of an article that originally appeared in the Huffington Post on May 5th, 2016. To read the original please follow this link http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/on-my-campus-jews-are-the-only-minority-we-dont-protect_us_572a9b98e4b046ff51c08a44 

*****************************

by Michael Sitver

Last week, some students at University of Chicago, where I attend, proposed a resolution to our College Council to divest from Chinese weapons manufacturers, in protest of China’s severe human rights abuses and its long-standing occupation of Tibet.

Members of the council were quick to condemn the resolution, and for good reason. The members noted it was political, and disrespectful to Chinese students. Other members noted that Chinese students should be given time to respond to the presenters with a counter-presentation. One representative even suggested that the College Council issue an apology to Chinese students for even considering the resolution. The resolution was tabled indefinitely.

Curiously, when a few weeks earlier the same College Council passed a nearly identical resolution condemning Israel, no one suggested an apology. These same representatives argued why it was their moral imperative to condemn Israel. They were determined to push this through at all costs, and despite requests, they didn’t even offer the other side an opportunity to present.

Over the past few weeks I have been told that Jews “don’t count” as a minority. I have been accused of using anti-semitism to justify oppression. All I want to know is why my campus doesn’t treat anti-semitism with the same rigor with which it treats any other forms of bias.

When Jews stood before the council, and asked that it recognize the Jewish right to self-determination, a basic right for all people, people in the room laughed. One representative noted that “If we were to affirm the right to Jewish self-determination … it takes away from the intent of the resolution”.

Students in the room that day called us racists and murderers and “apartheid supporters”, for even thinking we, as Jews, could have a voice in the discussion over the one small state we call our own. A Jewish student was chided “You are racist and you are against me and my family’s existence”. It was uncivil, and unproductive, but the council-members did not once that day condemn the personal nature of these attacks, or defend the rights of the opposition to make their case.

At one point, a student questioned the presenters, members of Students for Justice in Palestine (SJP), about their organization allegedly holding a moment of silence for Palestinians who were killed while trying to murder Jewish Civilians. One of the presenters confirmed the moment, then responded without missing a beat “Palestinians have a right to honor their martyrs”.

If the killing of any other ethnic group had been celebrated, the University would make grief counselors available. It would send out mass emails of condemnation. They would suspend the organization responsible, and possibly the students involved in it. The organization would certainly not have any credibility to present to the student government. Since the victims were Jews though, their celebration of murder went unchallenged. The representatives never even brought the issue up.

On the third slide of the presentation in favor of the resolution, presenters claimed that voting against the resolution would mean “maintaining a system of domination by Jews”. The presenters were relying on one of the most common, long-standing, overtly anti-semitic tropes to make their case, and our representatives said nothing.

On the very next slide, the presenters shared a series of maps which MSNBC once famously referred to as deceptive, and “completely wrong“. The maps (inaccurately) depict border changes between Israelis and Palestinians from 1946-200. What’s most striking is the label though: “Jewish land versus Palestinian land over time”. Not one representative questioned the label. Not one representative questioned the map. The only thing they were willing to question was the right for some state of Israel to exist, and the right to Jewish self-determination.

 

COURTESY: UOFCDIVEST
There were about 500,000 Jews in Israel in 1948, but if you saw this map you would never guess that. This also uses “Jewish” in place of “Israeli”.

Student after student at that first meeting stood to explain to representatives how political and contentious the BDS movement was. They pointed out the movement’s ties to terror and anti-semitism. Some suggested the representatives compromise and call for divestment, but drop the explicit ties to the BDS movement. On this issue, finally, our representatives spoke out.

“As a voting member, I don’t think it’s my job to appease people who don’t support BDS”.

On the China resolution, representatives were quick to point out that it “minimize[d] this issue into a political ploy”. When it came to Israel though, the Council was happy to attempt to speak for its 5,000 constituents without hearing from the other side. They even violated procedure to shut out student voices one meeting, to expedite the vote. The one student they allowed to speak at the meeting was an activist in favor of the resolution.

One representative pointed out to the council that “this [BDS resolution] is being passed a week after a presentation for 15 minutes from one side of the debate, and the opposition … was never formally given time before College Council”. Another pointed out that “it is disingenuous to say that we have moral voice to represent the students and speak on this issue”. That didn’t stop the same representative who seemed so concerned about minimizing the struggles of the Chinese people as a political ploy, from voting for another political ploy.

Their coldness in minimizing the struggles of Jews, living with a legacy of being expelled and exterminated, was mind-boggling to me.

Then again, these biases, and suppressions of speech shouldn’t surprise me, given the system that these Representatives work in. They control $2 million in funding for events and clubs, and they wield that power to silence dissenting voices.

When SJP held events in support of the divest resolution, one of the sponsors was University of Chicago’s own Office of Diversity and Inclusion.

This week is Yom Hashoah, which commemorates the six million Jews that were murdered by the Nazis during World War II. On this day of remembrance, we say “Never forget. Never again”. Yom Hashoah also commemorates an international commitment not to repeat the mistakes of the past.

Sadly, fifty-three years after this day was first honored, we seem to be forgetting those lessons. As a campus we’re remarkably tolerant of gender, race, and sexuality in general. Why is it that we’re so uncaring about this one, very real form of racism?

Update (4/05): One thing I didn’t originally emphasize enough is how grateful I am to the 4-5 representatives on the council who genuinely recognized what this resolution was, and spoke and stood against it. I’ve tried my best throughout this article not to name names, but I do want thank those representatives.

Sources:

 

Reflections on “Inside America’s Auschwitz”

24 Apr 10859119-essay[1]

By Elyse Warren

In the Smithsonian article, “Inside America’s Auschwitz,” Jared Keller wrestles with the shadows of America’s riddled past with racism after a visit to Louisiana’s Whitney Plantation Slavery Museum. The museum, which opened in December of 2014, marks the first museum in the nation to be recognized as a slave museum. The museum pays homage and bears witness to the history of slavery and crimes against humanity committed against the slaves who were forced into labor at the former indigo, sugar, and cotton plantation.

 

The memorialization and pedagogical design of the tours conducted at the museum break from the confines of the conventional history lesson given in the classroom or at other plantations. The focus is placed on providing the visitor the opportunity to understand the slave experience and remove, as Keller notes, the veil of the Gone With The Wind view of America’s Southern plantations. The experience disillusions the visitor from the romanticism associated with the grandeur of the planation homes and provides a narrative that can not only educate, but act as a change agent within the visitor when they conclude their experience.

 

This thoughtful design mirrors the experience of visiting sites of atrocities committed during the Holocaust in Eastern Europe, specifically the renowned pedagogy and reconciliation constructed through Germany and Poland’s memorialization of the Holocaust. Thanks to the generous support of the Jewish Federation and Dr. Barry and Mrs. Anne Stein, I participated in the March of the Living (MOL) in 2011 with five other high school students from Sarasota and witnessed the concentration camps in Poland and traveled to Israel. Reflecting on the experience, I can still vividly remember the sensory details of visiting the concentration camps and ghettos in Poland. The stench of the rotting wood of the barracks in Auschwitz-Birkenau, the scraped walls of the cattle car at the Lodz Ghetto, and the cold, sterile, space of the gas chambers at Majdonek that were stained with an effervescent turquoise blue from the Zyklon B chemicals. All the details wove together the prisoner experience in the concentration camps into the fabric of Holocaust memorialization and memory.

 

In particular, visiting the Auschwitz-Birkenau concentration camps manifested a poignant experience of walking through endless barracks and fields which evoked a painful feeling of absence. The absence was augmented by comfort and support from peers and the humbling ability to walk through the space with survivors to learn from their testimony. However, the experience would not have been whole without the strong use of narrative and contextualization provided in the education by the Auschwitz-Birkenau Memorial and Museum Center and the staff we had on the MOL. To better understand the role of education and how a nation tries to reconcile with a fraught past, I took my passion from the MOL trip and visited Poland again during a study abroad program in college the following year. I took the experience of the MOL trip and applied it to my studies of how Germany and Poland reconcile the memory of the Holocaust through education and memorialization. Staying in Oswiecim, where Auschwitz-Birkenau is located, helped me understand more fully the role pedagogy in education, as Keller commented, helps to build understanding and reconciliation with the past to ensure that “never again” reins absolute.

 

Paralleling Keller’s experience at the slavery museum, I felt a call to action when I left Poland after the March of the Living and again when I studied abroad. It was a discovery in terms of sense of self, belonging, and meaning not only to Judaism, but to Israel and preserving the history for the next generation to bear witness. Keller noticed the same call expressed in a tour group of young African American students that took to heart the moving mission of the museum. The article by Keller is his call to recognize and draw parallels to how America may learn valuable lessons from Germany, Poland, or even Rwanda in reckoning with the past centuries late.

 

While the two atrocities mentioned have different context and history, they both speak to the call for “never again.” We serve as stewards to the next generation, as the phrase L’dor Vador emphasizes. Echoing a note left at the slave museum, fostering and encouraging the movement to provide enriching educational experiences, whether through the March of the Living or a slave museum, will help ensure that the future generation knows and will not forget the past.

 

To learn more about the March of the Living program, click HERE.

 

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Public Invited to Interfaith Rally in Support of Israel

22 Oct

The Jewish Federation of Sarasota-Manatee invites you to an interfaith solidarity rally in support of Israel and her people on Tuesday, Oct. 27 at 5:30 p.m. Sing, dance and pray for peace as we gather together at J.D. Hamel Park in Sarasota (at the end of Main Street and U.S. 41).

  • This event is free and open to the public

  • Wear blue and white to show your support of Israel

  • Bring your own signs (JFED SRQ Will Have Some Available at the Rally)

  • Parking is available at the Bayfront and Palm Avenue parking garage

  • For more information, contact Jessi Sheslow at jsheslow@jfedsrq.org


Contact your representative and urge him/her to sign onto a bipartisan letter to Palestinian National Authority President Mahmoud Abbas that is being circulated by House Foreign Affairs Committee Chairman Ed Royce (R-CA) and Ranking Member Eliot Engel (D-NY). The lettter encourages Abbas to end the incitement of the recent violence that is occurring in Israel.

From the Desk of Howard Tevlowitz

20 Oct

Note to the U.N.:
Don’t Tamper with the
Jewish People’s Holiest Site

western wall

Photo: gomadnomad.com via Google Images

The Jewish Federation of Sarasota-Manatee is asking you to take action now. The Palestinians, with key Arab support, are seeking to undermine the historic attachment of Israel and the Jewish people to Jerusalem.

A resolution at the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) would designate the Kotel (Western Wall), the only still-standing remnant of the Temple in Jerusalem, as solely and exclusively an “integral part of the Al-Aqsa Mosque.”

This resolution is a malicious lie brought forth on behalf of the Palestinians by Algeria, Egypt, Kuwait, Morocco, Tunisia and the United Arab Emirates. If passed, it would be a systematic erasure and undisguised historical revision, robbing Jews of their history and identity.

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